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There are plenty of food tracking apps out there, but the Lifesum (download for iOS and Android) app has the unique distinction of being the first to work with Google Assistant (download for iOS or Android), making it easier than ever for users to log food and water with just their voice.

"People are leading increasingly fast-paced and busier lifestyles, so we wanted to offer a fun, innovative and time-efficient solution to help users track their food and water intake using just their voice," said Henrik Torstensson, CEO and co-founder of Lifesum. "We have a strong human tendency to avoid doing things that cost your brain energy and time and just maintain the status quo, and so using voice as a tool makes tracking much easier and simplifies the user's journey toward a more healthy lifestyle."

All users have to say to their Google Assistant-enabled iPhone, Android phone or Google Home to activate the feature is "Hey Google, talk to Lifesum," followed by phrases such as "Track a small breakfast," "Add three bottles of water" or "My weight is 148 pounds," and details are automatically tracked in the app. Lifesum will then respond with tips to help users do even better next time.

SEE: 9 best food tracking apps

Lifesum's voice tracking feature is designed to encourage users to log more of what they eat and drink in the moment, with more details of a meal to be inputted within the Lifesum app when it's more convenient. For example, if a user logs a small dinner using the voice command feature at a restaurant, they can get into more detail when they get home.

Lifesum, which aims to help its users achieve weight goals, build strength, increase energy and improve overall health with personalized health plans, was founded in Sweden, in 2013, by Henrik Torstensson (CEO) and Marcus Gners (COO). It's since become a leading health app on Android, WearOS by Google, iOS and Apple Watch with 30 million users around the world and was recently voted one of Apple's best Apple Watch apps.

When registering for an account, users are asked for their gender, age, height, weight, goal weight and how quickly they want to achieve their goal. They'll then get a recommended diet plan (low carb, keto, vegan and more) and can choose to accept it or not. Then they can start adding items using their voice via Google Assistant.

Users can also use their voices to demand Challenges or personalized daily actions based upon their current dietary requirements. Lifesum will ask whether they're home, and using contextual understanding will recommend an activity, such as "Take a few minutes to rearrange your kitchen shelves and get the sugary stuff out of sight!" or "Fill up your water bottle and put it somewhere you can see it."

"With our Challenges, we set a low bar for our users and hold their hand as we slowly raise it," said Henrik Torstensson. "The reward of accomplishing these daily actions has a lasting, positive impact on people's self-confidence and reinforces healthy behaviors."

Rounding out the new features are personalized progress updates where Users can also use speech commands to request a progress overview and be quickly presented with data like the number of calories they have consumed that day, their last recorded body weight and their weight goals, for easier tracking.

Lifesum is free to download and use, but users will need a Lifesum Premium subscription ($21.99 for 3 months; $29.99 for 6 months; $44.99 for 12 months) for extras like specialized diets, more detailed nutrition info and to sync their data with fitness apps.

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Takeaways

  • Lifesum has the unique distinction of being the first food tracker to work with Google Assistant, making it easier than ever for users to log food and water with just their voice.
  • Lifesum's voice tracking feature is designed to encourage users to log more of what they eat and drink in the moment, with more details of a meal to be inputted within the Lifesum app when it's more convenient.

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Joshua is an editor for CNET's Download.com. He covers the mobile tech and apps that power our lives and interviews celebrities about their favorite apps. Previously, he worked as an editor at Healthline and Gay.com and as a contributing writer for Mac Directory, MacAddict, SF Weekly, SF Examiner, and SF Chronicle.